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    How To Take Community College Courses That Transfer

    If you're a community college student who wants to transfer to a 4-year school, you have to take a certain number of courses in these six different categories.
    By Diane Melville - Updated: March 17, 2014

    How To Take Community College Courses That Transfer

    To earn an Associate in Arts degree (the degree you'll need before transferring) from community college, you'll have to take a certain number of courses in the following six categories: 

    COMMUNICATIONS, MATHEMATICS, PHYSICAL and LIFE SCIENCES, HUMANITIES and FINE ARTS, SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, and ELECTIVES.

    The biggest question that community college students have is:

    WHAT COMMUNITY COLLEGE COURSES WILL HAVE THE BEST CHANCE OF TRANSFERRING?

    To answer this question, we broke down the six categories that make up the community college AA degree, highlighting the courses within each that could help you successfully transfer to your dream school!

    THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE AA DEGREE AND RECOMMENDED COURSES

    COMMUNICATIONS

    This category focuses on course in speech and writing. These courses are generally pretty standardized, and there isn't a whole lot of room to be creative in your course selection.

    COURSES INCLUDE:

    English 101

    English 102

    Speech Communications

    MATHEMATICS

    The general rule of thumb for mathematics credits is this: If you are a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) major, you need to, at the very least, take mathematics courses up to Calculus 2. Everyone else should strongly consider taking at least Calculus 1.

    COURSES INCLUDE:

    College Algebra

    Pre-Calculus & Trigonometry

    Business Calculus or Calculus 1

    Calculus 2

    Statistics

    PHYSICAL AND LIFE SCIENCES

    For non-science majors, taking the minimum number of credits in the sciences is satisfactory. Those majoring in sciences (chemistry, physics, biology, etc.) should take higher level courses than the ones listed below and dive deeper into those courses. For example, someone majoring in chemistry should take major-level chemistry 101/102 and various labs.

    EXAMPLE COURSES FOR NON-MAJORS:

    General Biology

    Oceanography

    Basic Physics

    Meteorology

    General Chemistry

    HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS

    These course are your "cultural" course and are intended to broaden your understanding of worldly topics. Students not majoring in a humanity or fine art can take the minimum number of courses in this category. Majors should dive deeper into their chosen fields here. For example, Art History majors should take a fair amount of credits in Art History courses.

    EXAMPLE COURSES FOR NON-MAJORS:

    Music Appreciation

    Art History

    Art Appreciation

    Philosophy

    Humanities

    SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

    This category includes human behavioral students such as sociology and psychology and other course that can be categorized into what most of us know as "history" courses. Again, non-majors can get away with the bare-minimum credits in this category, while people majoring in these topics should take more than the required amount of credits.

    EXAMPLE COURSES FOR NON-MAJORS:

    Psychology 101

    Ethics 101

    Sociology 101

    Philosophy 101

    American Government

    GENERAL ELECTIVES

    Usually, to earn an Associate in Arts degree, you will have to take upwards of 24 credits in the "electives" category. While the term "elective" might imply that you can take whatever courses you want, it actually is just free space in your degree requirements to continue taking courses that are related to your major.

    For example, a chemistry major will have to take two semesters of chemistry, two semesters of chemistry lab, and various other lab-related courses. These course credit will not all fit into the "natural sciences" category; therefore, extra credits will roll into your electives.

    GENERAL RULES FOR ELECTIVES

    Rule #1: Take course that are similar to courses you would have taken had you started at the 4-year school that you would like to transfer to.

    Rule #2: Talk with your counselor before taking courses that are not related to your major.

    Rule #3: Electives are for you to be prepared to transfer as a junior for your major; take courses that will make you a stronger transfer applicant for your major.

    If you're a community college student who wants to transfer to a 4-year school, you have to take a certain number of courses in these six different categories.
    Por Diane Melville - Actualizado: 17 marzo 2014
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